“There are a couple of artists where the production and installation is really expensive,” Maccarone explains. “I wouldn’t have been able to do it on my own.” 

In the past year, Maccarone’s gallery has retrenched and downsized for financial reasons; she closed her New York space and reduced the stable of artists she represents from around 20 to about two. “As a gallery, economics are tough these days,” she says. “I’m struggling in this new world order, in terms of finding my place and voice.”

Her current strategy, she says, is “pivoting to a new model, where a gallery can work more fluidly.”

What’s for Sale
Despite what amounts to philanthropic contributions from Pornhub, Maccarone stresses that the exhibition is a commercial one.

Some of the objects are on loan—there are some gouaches by Louise Bourgeois, a series of prints by Lynda Benglis, and vintage photographs of Bettie Page that aren’t for sale—but many of the artworks come with price tags.

There’s everything from a vintage photo of pinup model Bunny Yeager that costs $500 to an $80,000 collage (acrylic, digital photo, fur, and linoleum) by Kathe Burkhart.

There will also be interactive pieces, including Karen Finley’s “Sext Me if You Can,” a performance wherein viewers spend 10 minutes sexting Finley, the content of which she then turns into paintings. (The piece was previously performed at the New Museum in New York.)

“I would hope this show has a huge audience,” Maccarone says. “I’m going to great lengths to make sure there are interactive works, with artists on the premises.”

As for potential criticism, Maccarone asserts: “I honestly don’t care.”

“For me, it’s one of the most inspiring things I’ve worked on in a long time,” she says. “There’s a way you’re supposed to behave in the art world—represent an artist, go to art fairs—but [art] should be anything goes.”